The best description of the indictment against Russian parties is from Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein:

 

You can read the full indictment here: https://www.politico.com/story/2018/02/16/text-full-mueller-indictment-on-russian-election-case-415670

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The US House Intelligence Committee has released, with Presidential authorization, the memo detailing alleged abuse of government surveillance powers by the FBI and DOJ.  Direct links to the memo are available here and here.  (The second link at docs.house.gov is currently slow, probably due to traffic.)

My analysis of this short document is that the FBI did in fact withhold source information from the FISA court about the Steele Dossier and about data from Fusion GPS, despite having this source information at the time of the initial FISA application and subsequent required renewals.  These sources (primarily Christopher Steele and Nellie Ohr) have obvious biases and conflicts of interest that would taint any evidence provided to the FISA court.  Multiple levels of FBI and DOJ administrators knew of these problems, but signed off on the surveillance requests anyway.

I am neither a lawyer nor a national security specialist, but I see no reason this document was ever classified, except to protect the names of DOJ and FBI administrators who signed off on the FISA requests, especially since the contents of the dossier and other Fusion GPS data was leaked to the press some time ago.

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In progressive states across the nation, lawmakers have been neutering themselves.  Illicit drugs are legalized – marijuana, of course.  But Oregon and California have both downgraded possession and use of small quantities of other drugs such as cocaine, heroin and even meth to a misdemeanor charge.  Panhandling, loitering, public nuisance, disorderly conduct and littering laws are routinely ignored in order to “support” the homeless.  Federal immigration laws are countered by the “sanctuary movement” seen in municipalities and even states.  Colleges and other public institutions regularly shut down the fundamental freedoms of free speech and assembly.

However, is this merely a shift in values, a change in how we judge our social behavior?  Or are there real consequences to this acceptance of lawlessness?

Read the rest of this entry »

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If you’d like to learn more about the “Googley Way,”  a political filter applied by Google to its workplace culture, you should read the formal complaint, Damore and Gudeman v Google LLC.  The evidentiary part of the complaint is fascinating and includes internal communications from managers and staff to support the suit.  My personal favorite calls for Damore’s firing to …

“… send a message that we have zero tolerance for intolerance.”

 

Drones and production line equipment don’t really count as robots.  A human is always there in control.  But now we are starting to see autonomous technology in every day use.  Some examples:

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Walmart’s Automated Shelf Scanner/Stocker

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Walmart’s EMMA (Enabling Mobile Machine Automation) Cleaning Floors

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Amazon Go (Grocery store with no check-out cashiers)

Of course, the companies say these will not replace workers, but I think  you can see above that isn’t true.  There are no cashiers at Amazon Go.  Walmart doesn’t need a custodian to mop the floors.  (Once they design a machine to clean the bathrooms, they won’t need custodians at all.)  In the meantime, humans will work side by side with robots:

You can read more about Walmart’s robots here and here.  You can read more about Amazon technology here. You can read more about where all of this will end up here.