Just ask Neville:

And then sit back and enjoy this:

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From the Oregonian:

Occupiers of Wherever, I have bad news for you: Billionaires make their billions by selling stuff for $49.95 with a two-year contract to “occupiers” like you. If you have a smart phone/pad, are sleeping in an REI tent, wear Nike/Adidas/Reebok, shop at Trader Joe’s, drink Starbucks (organic) coffee, occasionally eat at McDonald’s, or bought a new hybrid with “cash for clunkers,” you are part of the problem. You buy their stuff. That’s how they got rich.

You wanted that new iPhone with the latest apps preloaded. You signed up for guaranteed college loans to pay for a degree in “liberal studies.” You can’t wait to update your Facebook page or Tweet with your latest exploits. You love stuff. Admit it.

Greed isn’t only for the rich. We live in a cage we built ourselves out of the stuff we bought, usually on credit. (Nice sleeping bag, by the way.)

G.D. KNOX

More commentary on OWS here.

Richard Rahn suggests here how revolutions develop:

In poor societies, there are always a few rich people; and in rich societies, there are always a few poor people. A successful society is characterized by fewer poor each year and more middle class and rich. Revolutions take place when the number of poor rises faster than the number of middle class and rich. The poor, being less educated and having more of a static view of the world, blame their increasing hardship and numbers on the rich.

The real villains are those in the political class who pandered to the voter by promising more in benefits to be paid for by others – “the evil rich.” But if the rich people are taxed too much, they opt out by moving or no longer being rich, and then the tax revenues fail to keep up with the increases in spending until finally, the debt burden slowly sinks the ship. This is precisely what is going on in the United States and most European countries at the moment.

I wasn’t worried about Rahn’s analysis until I saw this:

Cake, anyone?

The OWS protestors should be careful what they ask for – they may end up with this:

(Of course, it could be worse. We could end up like the Eloi.)

Probably the best journalistic investigation of OWS I’ve seen:

http://www.observer.com/2011/09/the-wall-street-protesters-what-the-hell-do-they-want/

Now that’s “fair and balanced”!  (Unlike this excellent opinion piece by Mark Steyn, although he concurs.)