forsale

Earlier this month, Football Hall of Fame member Shannon Sharpe gave perhaps the clearest summary of the Social Justice philosophy, as it relates to race, I have ever read.  In response to a fellow athlete’s call  (Dez Bryant) for a focus on individual responsibility and achievement, rather than a focus on systemic racism, Sharpe said the following:

Okay, so I’m supposed to hold me accountable for slavery? What about Reconstruction? What about the Jim Crow South? What about segregation? What about the violation of my civil rights and my voting rights? So who do I hold accountable for that?… Dez, I can’t get ahead if someone is constantly keeping me behind.” – Shannon Sharpe

 

Sharpe’s analysis comes in two parts.  The first part is his question about who he (or we) can hold accountable for slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow laws, and segregation, in other words, systemic racism.  The answer is he (or we) can hold accountable those who were responsible for slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow laws and segregation.  The people who inflicted slavery on their fellow human beings are responsible.  The community leaders (and followers) who inflicted Jim Crow laws and segregation on other citizens are responsible.  But those people aren’t around any more.  They are gone and have been for a long time.

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Politico’s Jack Shafer and Tucker Doherty demonstrate that the media bias to the left is a function not only of who journalists are, but where they are.  In “The Media Bubble Is Worse Than You Think, ” the authors point to the overwhelming shift from traditional newsprint and television to internet publishers as employers of journalists.

This isn’t just a shift in medium. It’s also a shift in sociopolitics, and a radical one. Where newspaper jobs are spread nationwide, internet jobs are not: Today, 73 percent of all internet publishing jobs are concentrated in either the Boston-New York-Washington-Richmond corridor or the West Coast crescent that runs from Seattle to San Diego and on to Phoenix. The Chicagoland area, a traditional media center, captures 5 percent of the jobs, with a paltry 22 percent going to the rest of the country. And almost all the real growth of internet publishing is happening outside the heartland, in just a few urban counties, all places that voted for Clinton. So when your conservative friends use “media” as a synonym for “coastal” and “liberal,” they’re not far off the mark.

What makes their analysis so interesting is their application of social science techniques.  It’s hard to argue against media bias when the evidence is “data-driven” and statistically obvious.

You can read the full article here:  http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/04/25/media-bubble-real-journalism-jobs-east-coast-215048

pericles

 

The conservative is concerned, first of all, with the regeneration of the spirit and character—with the perennial problem of the inner order of the soul, the restoration of the ethical understanding, and the religious sanction upon which any life worth living is founded. This is conservatism at its highest. – Russell Kirk

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church-fire

 

The church bombings in Egypt last week, on Palm Sunday, are sadly far from uncommon.  Raymond Ibrahim of PJ Media documents multiple attacks on Christian churches in Egypt, called for by the Muslim leaders of that country.  ISIS, of course, has targeted Christians in Syria, Iraq and other countries.  Persecution of Christians continues in Africa, Asia, South America and even in Europe.  A report by Release International predicts a rise in violence against Christians around the world.

 

It is always better to be safe and ridiculed than vulnerable and praised. – Victor Hanson Davis

The scholar provides a quick overview of what history has taught us about global war.  You can read his short essay here:  http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2017/04/06/ancient_laws_modern_wars_133524.html