Politico’s Jack Shafer and Tucker Doherty demonstrate that the media bias to the left is a function not only of who journalists are, but where they are.  In “The Media Bubble Is Worse Than You Think, ” the authors point to the overwhelming shift from traditional newsprint and television to internet publishers as employers of journalists.

This isn’t just a shift in medium. It’s also a shift in sociopolitics, and a radical one. Where newspaper jobs are spread nationwide, internet jobs are not: Today, 73 percent of all internet publishing jobs are concentrated in either the Boston-New York-Washington-Richmond corridor or the West Coast crescent that runs from Seattle to San Diego and on to Phoenix. The Chicagoland area, a traditional media center, captures 5 percent of the jobs, with a paltry 22 percent going to the rest of the country. And almost all the real growth of internet publishing is happening outside the heartland, in just a few urban counties, all places that voted for Clinton. So when your conservative friends use “media” as a synonym for “coastal” and “liberal,” they’re not far off the mark.

What makes their analysis so interesting is their application of social science techniques.  It’s hard to argue against media bias when the evidence is “data-driven” and statistically obvious.

You can read the full article here:  http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2017/04/25/media-bubble-real-journalism-jobs-east-coast-215048

It is always better to be safe and ridiculed than vulnerable and praised. – Victor Hanson Davis

The scholar provides a quick overview of what history has taught us about global war.  You can read his short essay here:  http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2017/04/06/ancient_laws_modern_wars_133524.html

ancientstudents

From the educational philosophy of Dewey sprang the “relevance revolution” in schooling. The old curriculum, with its emphasis on hard mathematics, dead languages, ancient history, and books that are too long to read, is portrayed as an offense to modern children, a way of belittling their world and their hopes for the future. To teach them to spell correctly, to speak grammatically, to adopt the manners and values of their parents and grandparents is to cut them off from their only available sphere of action. And in the place of all that so-called knowledge, which is nothing in itself save a residue of the interests of the dead, they should be given, we are told, their own curriculum, addressed to the life that is theirs.  The immediate effect of the relevance revolution was to introduce into the classroom topics relevant to the interests of their teachers—topics like social justice, gender equality, nuclear disarmament, third-world poverty, gay rights…

To counter this argument it is not enough to point to all the ways in which a relevant curriculum debases learning by making ignorance into the measure of what should be taught. For what we dismiss as ignorance is often the smoothed and adapted outer form of accumulated knowledge, like the simple manners of ordinary people that seem inept in sophisticated company only because some forms of sophistication depend upon hiding this reservoir of social knowledge…  The real objection to relevance is that it is an obstacle to self-discovery.

Read Robert Scruton’s complete essay, “The Virtue of Irrelevance,” here: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2017/02/virtue-irrelevance-roger-scruton.html

billofrights

The Bill of Rights consists of the first 10 amendments to the US Constitution.  These amendments were written by James Madison at the request of several state delegations calling for greater Constitutional protection for individuals from the government.  These amendments were approved by Congress in 1789. You can read the Bill of Rights here.  You can read the 17 additional amendments to the Constitution here. (Source: Bill of Rights Institute)

nixon-clinton

Hillary Clinton began her political career working for the Watergate Committee’s chief counsel.  Now Secretary Clinton finds herself under investigation for covering up crimes committed by the candidate and her staff.  National Review’s John Fund points out the parallels in History Repeats: A Nixonian Cover-up in the Home Stretch of the Campaign.   Charles S. Faddis, a 20-year CIA officer, explains why Hillary’s emails matter and why it is obvious that she broke the law.  Roger Simon at PJ Media argues that Clinton’s candidacy has left America at Its Most Perilous Crossroads Since World War II.  Finally, I urge you to watch excerpts of a speech by Supreme Justice Anthony Kennedy outlining the importance of the Rule of Law for good governance, for effective democracy and for personal freedom.