What does embracing communism get “the people”?

U.S.S.R.: 20 million deaths; China: 65 million deaths; Vietnam: 1 million deaths; North Korea: 2 million deaths; Cambodia: 2 million deaths: Eastern Europe: 1 million deaths; Latin America: 150,000 deaths; Africa: 1.7 million deaths; Afghanistan: 1.5 million deaths; The international Communist movement and Communist parties not in power: about 10,000 deaths… The total approaches 100 million people killed.

  • from The Black Book of Communism: Crimes, Terror, Repression by Stephane Courtois, Nicolas Werth, Jean-Louise Panne, Adrzej Paczkowski, Karel Bartooek, and Jean-Louis Margolin.   Translated by Jonathan Murphy and Mark Kramer. 1997.
Advertisements

According to the US Census, there are currently 40.6 Americans living in poverty including 16 million children.  The US Department of Agriculture reports that 40.1 million Americans receive food stamps. HUD’s Annual Homeless Assessment Report estimates over 550,000 homeless people in this country.  There are 72 million Americans on Medicaid.  According to the US Department of Education, 50.7 million children attend public schools (K-12) in the US.  The NCAAP reports that there are currently 6.8 million incarcerated adults in this country, with 2.3 million African-Americans included in this population.

The US Department of Homeland Security estimates 12.1 million illegal immigrants in the US (including 800K DACA designees).  This group uses social services including schools, healthcare and other welfare services (as allowed by states).  They also send $120 billion out the country to other countries.  Once you adjust for limited federal and state taxes paid by individuals, the cost of federal and state services provided to illegal immigrants is approximately $116 billion a year (as estimated by FAIR).

Opening borders and eliminating ICE would increase the number of people in this country living in poverty, receiving food stamps, covered by Medicaid, homeless or incarcerated.  This would balloon costs for social services while taking money away from schools, workforce training, roads, and emergency services.  This is exactly what has happened in European countries who have seen a significant decrease in quality of life, an huge increase in tax burden and public debt, along with strained public services and an increase in crime and violence.

While it is admirable to want for others what we have, we should not punish our own citizens including the poor, the young, the homeless, the disadvantaged, the incarcerated and the sick, by opening the floodgates of open immigration.  We should take care of our own first.

johnkate

Oregon’s last governor, John Kitzhaber, served three and a quarter terms before he was forced to resign.  Governor Kitzhaber violated state laws against conflict of interest, misused his office for financial gain and improperly received gifts, and was fined $20,000 as civil penalty to settle 10 violations of state ethics law.  (No federal criminal charges were filed against the governor.)

The current governor, Kate Brown, seems to be walking in the footsteps of her predecessor.  Two of Governor Brown’s chiefs of staff had to resign due to violations of state ethics law.  Governor Brown had to amend her lobbying disclosure report after she falsely claimed $0 spent.  Governor Brown has used state funds to pay for private expenses such as her Oregon State Bar membership and personal items.  A recent independent report shows that Governor Brown has redacted an exceptionally large number of items (nearly 4000 items) from her state calendar while in office.  Most disturbing, the governor has received hundreds of thousands of dollars of campaign contributions from vendors who hold state contracts worth millions.

There seems to be a familiar pattern developing.  Hopefully, Oregon voters are paying attention.

The Alfie Evans outrage occurred in an NHS hospital with a long record of clinical negligence, including the worst scandal in the history of Britain’s National Health Service. Most of the media have covered Alfie’s case, with characteristic dishonesty, as a tragedy that began before the boy was taken to Alder Hey Children’s Hospital. But, according to the court testimony of the NHS physicians who admitted Alfie, his initial diagnosis involved a fairly common condition: “viral bronchiolitis and a possible prolonged febrile convulsion.” The still-undiagnosed brain disease that allegedly killed Alfie didn’t appear until after he entered this dangerous hospital.

The hospital has had many violations of law and regulations including illegal organ harvesting, multiple safety violations, and a high rate of hospital acquired infections (HAIs).  It seems likely that this last failure led to Alfie Evans’ death.  You can read full details here: https://spectator.org/alfie-evans-is-just-the-latest-victim-of-a-deadly-nhs-hospital/.

hospitalhall

When debating socialized medicine (and other government monopolized services), we often argue ad nauseum about models, theories and statistics.  Cost estimates are made and actuarial tables quoted. We make moral judgments about the motivations of our opponents.  We also forget that real people are affected in real ways by our decisions.  Two cases in point are Alfie Evans and Charlie Gard of the UK.

These little boys had several things in common.  They were very, very sick with little hope of recovery.  Their parents loved them very, very much and wanted to do everything they could to help them survive.  And the UK medical and judiciary system decided that both boys should die.  The parents and others wanting to continue medical treatment were banned from doing so.  When the parents asked the government for permission to take their sons out of the country to receive medical care in the US or in Italy, where care was offered, they were denied.

Charlie Gard is now deadAlfie Evans is still alive as this is being written, even after being taken off of life support, but is not receiving any care.  He will most likely die soon.

Socialized medicine failed these two boys.  Their government failed these two families.  Theories and models are not as important as the very real lives affected by the choices we make about governance.