In progressive states across the nation, lawmakers have been neutering themselves.  Illicit drugs are legalized – marijuana, of course.  But Oregon and California have both downgraded possession and use of small quantities of other drugs such as cocaine, heroin and even meth to a misdemeanor charge.  Panhandling, loitering, public nuisance, disorderly conduct and littering laws are routinely ignored in order to “support” the homeless.  Federal immigration laws are countered by the “sanctuary movement” seen in municipalities and even states.  Colleges and other public institutions regularly shut down the fundamental freedoms of free speech and assembly.

However, is this merely a shift in values, a change in how we judge our social behavior?  Or are there real consequences to this acceptance of lawlessness?

Read the rest of this entry »



If you’d like to learn more about the “Googley Way,”  a political filter applied by Google to its workplace culture, you should read the formal complaint, Damore and Gudeman v Google LLC.  The evidentiary part of the complaint is fascinating and includes internal communications from managers and staff to support the suit.  My personal favorite calls for Damore’s firing to …

“… send a message that we have zero tolerance for intolerance.”


Drones and production line equipment don’t really count as robots.  A human is always there in control.  But now we are starting to see autonomous technology in every day use.  Some examples:


Walmart’s Automated Shelf Scanner/Stocker


Walmart’s EMMA (Enabling Mobile Machine Automation) Cleaning Floors


Amazon Go (Grocery store with no check-out cashiers)

Of course, the companies say these will not replace workers, but I think  you can see above that isn’t true.  There are no cashiers at Amazon Go.  Walmart doesn’t need a custodian to mop the floors.  (Once they design a machine to clean the bathrooms, they won’t need custodians at all.)  In the meantime, humans will work side by side with robots:

You can read more about Walmart’s robots here and here.  You can read more about Amazon technology here. You can read more about where all of this will end up here.

To overcome the perils of the present and to achieve the promise of the future, we must begin with the wisdom of the past. Our success depends on a coalition of strong and independent nations that embrace their sovereignty to promote security, prosperity, and peace for themselves and for the world.

We do not expect diverse countries to share the same cultures, traditions, or even systems of government. But we do expect all nations to uphold these two core sovereign duties: to respect the interests of their own people and the rights of every other sovereign nation. This is the beautiful vision of this institution, and this is foundation for cooperation and success.

Strong, sovereign nations let diverse countries with different values, different cultures, and different dreams not just coexist, but work side by side on the basis of mutual respect.

Strong, sovereign nations let their people take ownership of the future and control their own destiny. And strong, sovereign nations allow individuals to flourish in the fullness of the life intended by God.

In America, we do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone, but rather to let it shine as an example for everyone to watch. This week gives our country a special reason to take pride in that example. We are celebrating the 230th anniversary of our beloved Constitution — the oldest constitution still in use in the world today.

This timeless document has been the foundation of peace, prosperity, and freedom for the Americans and for countless millions around the globe whose own countries have found inspiration in its respect for human nature, human dignity, and the rule of law.

Remarks by President Trump to the 72nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly, September 19, 2017



David Solway writes, “The displacement of the “individual” as a primary category of social and political thought — a distinctly observable trend in the contemporary West — is an infallible sign of civilizational despair.”  You can read his full argument in “The Death of the Individual.”  While Solway concentrates on the philosophical sources of this trend, Franklin Foer points to the effects technology has on culture to demonstrate “How Silicon Valley Is Erasing Your individuality.”  Of course, the observation that the modern is “erasing” the individual is nothing new.  Aldous Huxley wrote about this in his dystopian novel, “Brave New World.”  You can hear the author discuss his predictions in this interview (from 1958):