The unemployment rate among those with a high school education is 3.9 percent. The poorest quintile of Americans have seen their post-tax incomes increase 80 percent since 1979, according to Congressional Budget Office data, and post-tax and transfer income for that quintile has skyrocketed 32 percent since 2000. The upper-middle class in America constituted 13 percent of the population in 1979; as of 2014, it constituted 30 percent. According to Pew Research from 2015, when it comes to standard of living, “The U.S. stands head and shoulders above the rest of the world. More than half (56 percent) of Americans were high income by the global standard … and 2 percent were poor.” – Ben Shapiro, The Ungrateful Nation

The overall crime rate for 2018, meanwhile, is projected to fall by 2.9 percent compared to 2017. “If this estimate holds, this group of cities will experience the lowest crime rate this year since at least 1990,” – German Lopez, So far this year, crime and murder are trending down in America’s biggest cities

THE Conventions of a number of the States, having at the time of their adopting the Constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added: And as extending the ground of public confidence in the Government, will best ensure the beneficent ends of its institution.  – Read The Bill of Rights (Constitutional Amendments 1-10) courtesy National Center for Constitutional Studies

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Brett Kavanaugh is not white privilege.  He is not toxic masculinity.  He is not misogyny.  He is not uncontrolled rage.  He is a human being.  He deserves to be judged on what he has done as a person.  This includes, by all accounts, being a good judge, a good citizen, a good father, and a good husband.

Judge Kavanaugh should not be judged for something he did not do.  All of the accusations he has faced are unsubstantiated and most are ridiculous.  It was right that the Senate (and FBI) considered Professor Ford’s accusations.  But her testimony is uncorroborated (by her own witnesses) and inconsistent (by her own words).  Neither the Senate nor the FBI has found any evidence in support of her claim.

The time for investigation is over.  Now the Senate must do its Constitutional duty and vote.  No more delays.  No more fraudulent claims.  No more dirty tricks.  Vote.  And vote on the man, not the political symbol.

To overcome the perils of the present and to achieve the promise of the future, we must begin with the wisdom of the past. Our success depends on a coalition of strong and independent nations that embrace their sovereignty to promote security, prosperity, and peace for themselves and for the world.

We do not expect diverse countries to share the same cultures, traditions, or even systems of government. But we do expect all nations to uphold these two core sovereign duties: to respect the interests of their own people and the rights of every other sovereign nation. This is the beautiful vision of this institution, and this is foundation for cooperation and success.

Strong, sovereign nations let diverse countries with different values, different cultures, and different dreams not just coexist, but work side by side on the basis of mutual respect.

Strong, sovereign nations let their people take ownership of the future and control their own destiny. And strong, sovereign nations allow individuals to flourish in the fullness of the life intended by God.

In America, we do not seek to impose our way of life on anyone, but rather to let it shine as an example for everyone to watch. This week gives our country a special reason to take pride in that example. We are celebrating the 230th anniversary of our beloved Constitution — the oldest constitution still in use in the world today.

This timeless document has been the foundation of peace, prosperity, and freedom for the Americans and for countless millions around the globe whose own countries have found inspiration in its respect for human nature, human dignity, and the rule of law.

Remarks by President Trump to the 72nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly, September 19, 2017

 

I am mortified beyond expression when I view the clouds that have spread over the brightest morn that ever dawned upon any Country. In a word, I am lost in amazement when I behold what intrigue, the interested views of desperate characters, ignorance and jealousy of the minor part, are capable of effecting, as a scourge on the major part of our fellow Citizens of the Union; for it is hardly to be supposed that the great body of the people, tho’ they will not act, can be so shortsighted, or enveloped in darkness, as not to see rays of a distant sun thro’ all this mist of intoxication and folly.

You talk, my good Sir, of employing influence to appease the present tumults in Massachusetts. I know not where that influence is to be found; and if attainable, that it would be a proper remedy for the disorders. Influence is no Government. Let us have one by which our lives, liberties and properties will be secured; or let us know the worst at once. Under these impressions, my humble opinion is, that there is a call for decision. Know precisely what the insurgents aim at. If they have real grievances, redress them if possible; or acknowledge the justice of them, and your inability to do it in the present moment. If they have not, employ the force of government against them at once. If this is inadequate, all will be convinced that the superstructure is bad, or wants support. To be more exposed in the eyes of the world, and more contemptible than we already are, is hardly possible. To delay one or the other of these, is to exasperate on the one hand, or to give confidence on the other, and will add to their numbers; for, like snow-balls, such bodies increase by every movement, unless there is something in the way to obstruct and crumble them before the weight is too great and irresistible.

These are my sentiments. Precedents are dangerous things; let the reins of government then be braced and held with a steady hand, and every violation of the Constitution be reprehended: if defective, let it be amended, but not suffered to be trampled upon whilst it has an existence.

Jenna Ellis at the National Review has an excellent essay explaining that the government does NOT grant rights – it protect them.  (Or should protect them.)

Unalienable rights are endowed by our Creator upon every human by virtue of being human, and privileges are given by our American government to a specific group of people — Americans. The U.S. Constitution is only five pages. It’s not complicated. That’s because it doesn’t grant rights to the American people, it grants specific, limited powers to the federal government to operate in accordance with the Declaration’s mandate: preserving and protecting the rights we the people already possess.

Read more from Jenna Ellis here.