“The Whirlwind Is Already Here” writes Scott S. Powell.  He’s probably right.

The Critical Theory project emphasized and prioritized the demolition of Christianity and the nuclear family. They also sought to exacerbate race relations and promote massive immigration to destroy national identity. Additional focal points in their agenda encouraged dependency on state benefits and the bending of the legal system to favor perpetrators of crime over victims. And lastly, the agenda sought to dumb down the media and undermine schools’ and teachers’ authority.

An important part of the Critical Theory project of total transformation of society was to break down traditional relationships between men and women by promoting and legitimizing unhinged sexual permissiveness with no cultural or religious restraint. Building on the Frankfurt School’s Critical Theory, leaders of what came to be known as Postmodernism advanced the wrecking ball cultural deconstruction project right through the turn of the 21stcentury.

Postmodernists have had no use for tradition or any standards of normalcy, believing that all truth is contrived illusion rather than absolute.

You can read his full essay (and you should) here: https://spectator.org/the-whirlwind-is-already-here/

 

 

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Here is a very depressing chart correlating the cost of education with the performance of students:

Of course, it’s no surprise that the cost of education has increased.  (I don’t like it, but what are you going to do?)  But look at performance.  No significant improvement in reading and math, and science got worse!  Whatever the problem with public education is, it isn’t more spending needed.  As Conservatives often suggest, throwing money at a problem doesn’t solve it.  It may make it worse.

(If you’d like a nice breakdown of educational costs, national and by state, here is an easy-to-read summary  by The Room 241 Team at Concordia University.)

 

 

Congressman Trey Gowdy asking the tough questions (as usual), this time in a speech* at Liberty University:

 

(It’s a bit long.  But worth listening to.)

ancientstudents

From the educational philosophy of Dewey sprang the “relevance revolution” in schooling. The old curriculum, with its emphasis on hard mathematics, dead languages, ancient history, and books that are too long to read, is portrayed as an offense to modern children, a way of belittling their world and their hopes for the future. To teach them to spell correctly, to speak grammatically, to adopt the manners and values of their parents and grandparents is to cut them off from their only available sphere of action. And in the place of all that so-called knowledge, which is nothing in itself save a residue of the interests of the dead, they should be given, we are told, their own curriculum, addressed to the life that is theirs.  The immediate effect of the relevance revolution was to introduce into the classroom topics relevant to the interests of their teachers—topics like social justice, gender equality, nuclear disarmament, third-world poverty, gay rights…

To counter this argument it is not enough to point to all the ways in which a relevant curriculum debases learning by making ignorance into the measure of what should be taught. For what we dismiss as ignorance is often the smoothed and adapted outer form of accumulated knowledge, like the simple manners of ordinary people that seem inept in sophisticated company only because some forms of sophistication depend upon hiding this reservoir of social knowledge…  The real objection to relevance is that it is an obstacle to self-discovery.

Read Robert Scruton’s complete essay, “The Virtue of Irrelevance,” here: http://www.theimaginativeconservative.org/2017/02/virtue-irrelevance-roger-scruton.html