tacobell

It’s true. Taco Bell is adding 100,000 jobs over the next 6 years.  But this is merely a continuation of a troubling trend.  The vast majority of jobs that have been added to the US economy since the recession continue to be low paying, low benefited jobs. While unemployment is down, millions of workers must work more than one job, sometimes multiple part-time jobs, to support themselves and their families.  Many workers are still eligible for and receive state and federal welfare benefits.  Unfortunately, the job growth areas projected to increase most are in Retail, Services, and Healthcare, all with heavy concentrations of low wage employment.

You can read more about the lack of good paying jobs here and here.

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betterway

 

Hillary Clinton doesn’t have a plan.  Donald Trump doesn’t have a plan.  Neither Johnson nor Stein have a plan.  You know who does?  Speaker Paul Ryan.  Read more here.

There are few cities in the US more liberal than Washington D.C. so it wasn’t surprising when the mayor and city council raised the minimum wage from $8.25/hr to $11.50/hr.  What is surprising, to some, are the results of the wage hike.  A study by the Employment Studies Institute shows that about half of employers surveyed either reduced worker hours or laid off workers in response.  (How did the city respond?  They raised the minimum even higher.) This and other studies from the institute on the negative effects of a large minimum wage boost are available here.

Only 38,000 new jobs were created nationally in May.  This is off projections by about 120,000.  Most of these new jobs were in healthcare.  There was a decrease in unemployment by about 480,000, but there was an increase in involuntary part-time work of about 470,000.  In other words, unemployment dipped because workers had to settle for part-time hours.  You can read the detailed “Employment Situation Summary” from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics here.

Most likely, they will do what they’ve already done in Europe and China – install self-service kiosks. (Don’t laugh.  Where have all the video stores gone?  Redbox.)  Say goodbye to those “livable wage” entry level jobs.

The good news is that it looks like fun to build a giant fast food burger meal costing £16 (about $23 American).