Cinema Verite: Be Water HK

October 11, 2019

How do Hong Kong protesters resist constant surveillance and social credit, not to mention physical threats and violence?

 

 

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The U.S. Constitution was signed by 39 representatives on September 17, 1787, creating our government and recognizing our rights as citizens.  At no other time and at no other place has a group of citizens enjoyed both the freedoms and the protections we now have.  I hope we appreciate it.  You can read the Constitution (and the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence) here:  https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs

 

 

“We all agree that fighting so that each person is free to believe, free to assemble, and to teach the tenets of his or her own faith is not optional – indeed, it is a moral imperative that this be permitted. All people from every place on the globe must be permitted to practice their faith openly – in their homes, in their places of worship, in the public square – and believe what they want to believe. This week, we need input from all of you on how we can best advance that religious freedom…I want you to know that America’s commitment to religious freedom will never waver. We stand with you and for you in each stage of this fight.” – Sec. of State Mike Pompeo

The second annual Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom is currently going on in Washington DC, hosted by the US State Department.  The Ministerial to Advance Religious Freedom brings together leaders from around the world to discuss the challenges facing religious freedom, identify means to address religious persecution and discrimination worldwide, and promote greater respect and preservation of religious liberty for all.  You can stream the event live, read transcripts of speakers, and view biographies of survivors here: https://www.state.gov/ministerial-to-advance-religious-freedom/

 

 

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I can’t think of a better way to celebrate Independence Day, and my 1000th post, than by reading our country’s “Charters of Freedom” – the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution and our Bill of Rights.  You can read all three here and even view photos of the source documents from the National Archives.

 

 

Another short history lesson (a fun one, I think).