church-fire

 

The church bombings in Egypt last week, on Palm Sunday, are sadly far from uncommon.  Raymond Ibrahim of PJ Media documents multiple attacks on Christian churches in Egypt, called for by the Muslim leaders of that country.  ISIS, of course, has targeted Christians in Syria, Iraq and other countries.  Persecution of Christians continues in Africa, Asia, South America and even in Europe.  A report by Release International predicts a rise in violence against Christians around the world.

 

Trailer: Under Caesar’s Sword from Under Caesar’s Sword on Vimeo.

Stop saying, “This is the most important election in the history of our nation.” It’s not. The most important election in the history of our nation was when Abraham Lincoln was elected president. Before that, we thought it was OK to own people.

– From 7 things Christians Need to Remember About Politics, Relevant Magazine

 

It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may therefore very well discard their conclusions for something more modern. But that reasoning can not be applied to this great charter. If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final. No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions. If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people. Those who wish to proceed in that direction can not lay claim to progress. They are reactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers.  – President Calvin Coolidge, The Inspiration for the Declaration, 1926

Coolidge explains how our country is historically and practically based on principles, and demonstrates how “…Governments do not make ideals, but ideals make governments.”  You can read his entire speech here.

After a brief statement of faith from Teddy Roosevelt, Os Guinness explains the geometry of freedom in America: